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Showing posts with label Women In Trucking Association. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Women In Trucking Association. Show all posts

Friday, November 17, 2017

How To Combat The Driver Shortage

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ExpressTruckTax supports truckers
There is a major driver shortage facing the trucking industry and with the upcoming ELD mandate a lot of truckers, including the road veterans who love their job may quit.

If the driver shortage grows at an even more rapid rate the nation could face economic disaster because truckers are the backbone of our economy. With a current driver shortage of 48,000 drivers that’s only increasing we hope carriers are doing something to combat the issue. We even have a few ideas on how they can do so.

Fighting The Driver Shortage


1. Make Trucking More Inviting To Women

Women are an untapped working resource in America. While 47% of women make up the workforce only 6% are in trucking. That’s an incredibly low number, even though statistically women are better drivers. They have a lower rate of getting into accidents and often benefit from lower insurance rates because of it.

One thing that might turn women away from the industry is its reputation for being super manly. For example, if the true road warriors get hurt, they don’t notice. They simply rub some dirt in it and go about their days. Trucking can seem so manly at times it may be intimidating.

That’s why there are groups like Women In Trucking that show off women drivers, advocate for them, and show ladies that they have what it takes to become awesome truckers. Use their example to bring more gender diversity to the industry.

2. Should the Industry Lower The CDL Age?


Currently, if you’re under 21 you can only get your CDL for intrastate trucking. That means you can only deliver loads within your state until you turn 21. This makes things tricky for young drivers because local jobs tend to go to older, more experienced drivers.

If a younger person wants to become a driver the 3-year gap of having to wait after high school could be extremely demotivating. Plus, they might find another career path while they’re waiting.

But is 18 too young? Some experienced drivers say that there is no way an 18-year-old can handle the trucking lifestyle, while others say, if they are serious and mature enough to handle it then they should be able to.

3. Improve Health Conditions

Depending on how you handle it, trucking can be an extremely unhealthy profession. Sometimes drivers don’t make enough pay to get healthier food options, so they spend what they can on unhealthy fast food options for every meal.

Also, if they drive too many hours and need to sleep, they don’t have any time to work out. Plus, most carriers don’t provide drivers with good health benefits, so they don’t even have the tools they need to check up on their health.

ExpressTruckTax supports female truckers
Things like raising pay, reducing OTR hours, providing good health benefits, and providing health education could make a major difference. Obesity, heart conditions, and sleep apnea are only a few of the major health risks facing the industry.

Free health screenings, work out equipment in the cab, seminars about how to eat healthier on the road, and more could really improve trucker health and as a result, less people might be scared away from becoming a driver.

We Support Truckers


Our nation only functions because of the hard work that drivers do every single day and night. The growing shortage could cause a major economical disaster, but hopefully, carriers are getting prepared to combat it.

Please share your ideas about how to combat the shortage in the comment section below and visit ExpressTruckTax.com for more trucking blogs.
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Tuesday, May 31, 2016

Driver Shortage: Where to Find New Truckers

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Driver Shortage
Driver Shortage
You hear it all the time - there’s a driver shortage. Yet you look around, and there are still plenty of trucks out there.

Well, it’s not just that there is a shortage, it’s that the shortage is only going to increase as the industry ages.

Unfortunately, the industry needs around 48,000 drivers, and that number will only increase as the main working force continues to age.

So what is the best solution? Some experts are calling for a focus on recruiting younger hires and women drivers.

Women in Trucking


Admittedly, there are some physical differences between men and women that can prove challenging, according to Ellen Voie, President of the Women in Trucking Association.

But when you think about it, women make up 47% of the labor force, yet only 6% of truckers are women. This is what drives the Women in Trucking Association.

As it stands, your standard truck might be designed only with the male trucker in mind. But Voie is lobbying for changes, going as far as to meet with Peterbilt engineers earlier this year.

Voie also addressed the Future Truck Committee this year, where she said that the one-size-fits-all approach for trucks is likely costing companies the drivers they are in need of.

Young Truckers


In North America, the average truck driver age is over 47. More distressing is that this number has just been going up, and over 30% of the driving force is over 55.

Some think that the lifestyle just doesn't attract the younger generation. Being on the road definitely limits you from friends and family, which can be a shock for the younger, more intertwined generation.

Which is why some drivers consider trucking a passion more than your standard job. You can’t deny, it definitely carries it's own atmosphere and lifestyle ramifications.

As new truckers do come into the industry, let’s do them a favor and let them know the easiest way to get your stamped Schedule 1 is to e-file your HVUT 2290s with ExpressTruckTax.

How do you think the industry can attract new drivers? Let us know on Facebook (or) Twitter!


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Thursday, March 20, 2014

Trucking Industry: Ryder Partners With Women In Trucking Association

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 It’s the first day of Spring
so let your engines sing
roll your windows down
and feel the breeze as you drive through town
the days are finally bright
bringing the flowers in the median to light
take in all the open road’s amazing view
Spring has sprung just for you





Happy Thursday to the entire Trucking Nation - it is officially Spring. Some places may still be feeling the cold shoulder of nature, but do not fret warmer weather is on its way.

There is a lot going on in the trucking industry for Spring, but Women In Trucking Association is making a big impact.

Ryder is introducing female-friendly trucks to its fleet based on recommendations from Women in Trucking (WIT), to encourage more women drivers to join the ranks of fellow truckers. It isn’t new that there is a driver shortage within the trucking industry and more and more women drivers are taking to the road.

Scott Perry - VP, Purchasing and Supply Management of Ryder System, Inc.- says, “It’s important for manufacturers to take women’s needs into consideration when designing and specifying new vehicles, and we are encouraging all of our major suppliers to do so.”

What is to be considered when designing and specifying new vehicles with women’s needs?
WIT and Dr. Jeanette Kersten - Assistant Professor of Operations and Management Department for the College of Management at the University of Wisconsin-Stout in Menomonie, Wisconsin - whew how do they fit that title on a business card, anyway...

The study Dr. Kersten and her graduate students developed explains, that the average female driver is six inches shorter and 50 lbs lighter than the average male driver, so some female drivers have challenges with setting their seats for easy access to the pedals, maximum visibility of the gauges and mirrors and with regard to cab accessibility, such as getting into their trucks. According to their study, women are more prone to slips, trips and falls because steps and handrails are placed in locations designed for men. Changing handrail placements and adjusting the seat settings are simple design specifications truck manufacturers can implement to create a safer environment for women in trucking.

Scott Perry says, “ Many of the same design changes will also support the needs of men who are smaller in stature, as well as the growing population of aged male drivers. With the current industry-wide shortage of professional drivers, this is a strategic initiative that can have far-reaching implications for truck fleets.”

To sum it up...
Ellen Voie, CEO of Women In Trucking provides the perfect words to sum up what Ryder is trying to accomplish, and hopefully more truck manufacturers will follow, “There are close to 200,000 women truck drivers, and that number is steadily growing. Having Ryder’s support, particularly given their strong relationships with top vehicle manufacturers, represents a significant step forward to help the industry attract more female drivers and improve the work environment for the thousands of women who’ve already established careers as professional drivers.”



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