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Showing posts with label freight brokers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label freight brokers. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

Working Together in the Trucking Industry

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You hear of it all the time—truckers dealing with nightmare dispatchers, pushing them to their limits and making the job dangerous.

And from the dispatcher’s desk you’d probably hear a slew of bad trucker stories.

But we’re not here to point fingers!

We’re actually here to discuss communication between the many facets of the trucking industry.

Start from the Top


Truckers take the freight where it needs to go. Everybody knows that!

But business plans, shipment orders, and staffing requirements come from the top half of the industry. Sure, sometimes it's fun to dog on the suits in the offices, but they do play a vital role in the industry.

With support staff including managers, sales teams, dispatchers, communications professionals, and mechanics, truckers aren’t the only hats in the business.

But they sure are the most important! Much like an assembly line or a rowing team, everyone needs to play their part, but the truckers are your star athletes.

With the right people at the top watching out for drivers, we’ll be in a good spot as an industry.

People Are People


Sometimes it's easy for both sides of the industry to forget they’re dealing with people.

As a trucker, you KNOW you’re a person, but it's sometimes hard to get along with someone when your dispatcher sees you just as a number they’re tracking.

You represent a set of statistics, yes, but you’re still a person.

And you know more than anyone that electronic devices shooting out numbers can’t match up to human intuition.

On the flip side, the dispatchers, managers, and clients you deal with are also trying to do a job.

Just like you sometimes have a bad day, they do, too. And they also have to deal with all of their drivers’ bad days, too.

So above all else, make sure both sides use people skills and we can make working together a lot easier for the whole industry.

The Rig vs. The Office


You might know how we feel about offices already.

That job works for some, but it's a different ballgame altogether. An office is a field where employees need to work together, day to day.

There are lots of spoken and unspoken rules about how coworkers can act and speak to each other.

Yet as a trucker, you are more frank with your thoughts and feedback, like a warrior-poet strapped to 18 wheels of philosophy. You’ll share your thoughts with whoever you please!

This might come as a shock to anyone who is new to the industry, or has minimal contact with truckers on a daily basis.

That’s not your fault, by any means. But with a little understanding, both sides can communicate better.

Let's Work Together


But when it comes down to it, the best thing you can do as a driver, a dispatcher, or a manager is to keep the people in your industry on your good side.

A positive attitude, some kindness, and mutual respect will go far.

There are always going to be people who grind your gears, but with some honest effort and respect, there can be plenty of personal friendships and professional alliances you rely on in this job.

When it comes to working together, let us work with you on your HVUT 2290s this next truck tax season. If you have questions about filing Form 2290, reach out to our support experts at Support@ExpressTruckTax.com and by phone at 704.234.6005.

How do you think we can improve communication between players in the trucking industry?


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Monday, December 13, 2010

Getting Familiar With The Setup Process With Freight Brokers

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Featured Blogger
Benjamin Bellville
Today I would like to point out some key things to look for in the setup process with freight brokers. This of course being when you will have to fill out an information packet and fax it back to a broker before they will allow you to haul their freight. I’m going to talk about the type of information you will receive from them and it’s relevance, the information and forms you will need to send back to them and the little things you should look for in the packet that if not followed correctly may cost you a bundle.

What type of info will a freight broker include about themselves?

With every freight broker setup packet you will receive many pages of information about that broker. These are not pages that you need to send back, but they are pages that you should save and staple together with the finished packet after you have faxed back what was required. This information at a minimum will include the following:

   1. All of the freight brokers contact information.
   2. Their freight brokers authority page (MC#)
   3. Their Insurance carrier information.
   4. The brokers surety bond.
   5. A reference page. (showing companies they have brokered freight to)

This is all information that you could find out just by knowing their MC#, but it’s just easier to have it on hand should they decide to stiff you on a payment and you need to make a claim against them.

What type of info will they require from me?

This is going to depend on the freight broker you are dealing with,some have very short packets (you will be thankful when you get that lucky!) and some will expect you to fill out an encyclopedia worth of what is sometimes pointless it would seem. following are the main things you will be asked to return every time guaranteed.

   1. A copy of your authority (MC#)
   2. Copy of your insurance.
   3. A current W-9.
   4. A carrier profile page.
   5. The contract with each page initialed and dated as well as properly signed.

For this reason it would be a great idea to have copies of the first 3 on your computer easily accessible if you are using an email fax server. After you have seen a few carrier profile pages it would also be a good idea to make one of your own as every now and then you will come across a broker who wants one, but fails to send you a form.

Things to look for in the setup process with freight brokers!

Some of this information will also be included in fine print on the load rate confirmation, which is the actual contract that a freight broker and trucking company enter into on a load by load basis. What you want to watch for is their policies that need to be followed that in many cases if not followed will garner a fine for your company. These may include the following stipulations:

   1. Fines for not being on time to a pickup or delivery.
   2. Fines for being reported as being uncooperative with their customers.
   3. Fines for damaged freight.
   4. Fines for not contacting them with load movement updates on their schedule.
   5. Payment information pertaining to what they will or won’t cover for things such as tolls, lumper fees,detention and layover.

Once you get the hang of the things to look for it’s best to just ask the broker any questions you may have about these things before you have them fax you a setup pack. Their will be some brokers who are too demanding and who are sticklers for all fines they say may be levied against you regardless of the circumstances. It’s a learning process every time you do business with a new broker, but if you pay attention to details you should have no problem at all.

Now that you’ve learned all about the setup process with freight brokers go on over and check out how easy the folks here at Express 2290 can make filing for your Heavy Vehicle Use Taxes which are required to be paid and proof shown before you can get your I.R.P.
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