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Showing posts with label independent contractor. Show all posts
Showing posts with label independent contractor. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 2, 2018

Everything You Need to Know 1099 vs. W2

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Everything You Need to Know 1099 vs. W2
As a fleet owner should you give your drivers a 1099 or W-2 Form? That’s the question for truck drivers and fleets we hear a lot. You might think you have a ton of time before the tax season, however, now is the time to get your documents in order. The last thing you want is the IRS on your case about the classification of your drivers.

While we do tend to focus on Form 2290, we understand the personal taxes of a professional truck driver can make a huge difference for both companies and drivers. 

Do Your Drivers Need a 1099 or W-2?

Misclassifications continue to be a subject for concern among both companies and drivers, so it is a point that needs particular attention. So how should your fleet approaches classification?

When you bring on a new driver, you should determine if they are a full-time employee or an independent contractor. This should be priority number 1!

This will determine if they will receive a 1099 or W-2. Now, we’ve heard stories from some drivers where companies won’t discuss employee status until tax forms are due, but we suggest clear and open communication with your drivers from the very beginning.

Some fleets might be tempted to put the burden of taxes on drivers and send them a Form 1099, but that route can only be traveled with specific conditions geared towards independent contractors.

My point is that treating a full-time employee as an independent contractor will lead the IRS to your front door. Plus, the IRS get their money one way or another. Might as well keep your classifications kosher. 

Independent Contractor or Company Driver?

The status of your drivers needs to be determined before the hiring process even starts. There are specific guidelines set by the IRS on what classifies as a contractor and which 1099 to file.

If you’re an independent contractor, you will have to cover your end of government expenses, but you also have more choice in how you haul.

Don’t Wait Until The Last Minute

If you have any questions about your business tax forms, contact our sister product, TaxBandits. It is their mission to help your business save time and money this upcoming tax season. Their bilingual support team is available via phone, live chat, and email. Click here to learn more.



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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

We're Revealing 8 Secrets About Average Owner Operators

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If you’re thinking about finally taking the leap to become an owner operator in most cases the risk is worth the reward, if done properly. However, if done improperly you could go under pretty quickly and build up a lot of debt. In order to see if the owner operator or independent trucker lifestyle is right for you, we’ve put together a list of common traits found in successful owner operators.

Secrets About The Average Owner Operator


1. Owner operators are financially smart. When the bigger paychecks finally start to roll in they don’t blow it all on a new pool table or jet ski. They set money aside until they can afford that cool stuff later in order to plan for accidents like major truck repairs or for when business is slow. Engine repairs or accidents can set you back quite a ways, so it’s best to be prepared.

2. They’re older guys. I guess some truckers just need to grow up a little first before making the transition to becoming an independent driver instead of a corporate jockey. The average age of truckers for both men and women is about 37 when they become owner operators and the average age of owner operators out there on the road right now is 55.

3. Most are patient and persistent creatures of habit. They’ve lived and driven around the same area for years, and realize that success doesn’t come overnight. You could spend years building your personal business before it really takes off.

Plus, they take care of their trucks with regular maintenance. By squeezing every penny possible out of their rig it will last longer and they won’t have to deal with the major expenses of getting a new one, so don’t skip out on those oil changes, tire rotations, tune-ups, and more.

4. The majority of owner operators are gone most of the time. They put in more hours and spend more nights away from home. More miles put on the road is simply a part of the job if you want to make it. To avoid putting stress on your family and relationships remember to call time or facetime them as much as possible. Hopefully, you won’t feel guilty about missing a few holidays or special occasions too.

5. Now this isn’t a plus, but it is a fact. Most owner operators are unhealthy. They’re obese, they’re smokers, and have issues like high blood pressure. In order to take your business further and have the energy to maintain it get a little healthier. Try to go for healthy snacks like a package of almonds or a heart healthy omelet for breakfast. Maybe see where you can fit in an extra walk around the truck stop or experiment with exercises you can do from your cab.

6. Owner operators tend to be experienced, drivers. They have some education like a high school degree and maybe a little college, but in most cases, they went to driving school and completed their courses. They were determined students who put at least 60 hours of driving training behind the wheel to learn how to drive like a boss. Plus, most owner operators don’t come from average desk jobs, they spend a few years out on the road trucking for companies first.

7. The average owner operator is a planner. They don’t spend down time twiddling their thumbs or checking facebook, they spend it planning their next move. When their freight is being unloaded they’re scheduling a new pick up. Also, they’re always thinking about who they need to call in order to build good relationships and gain repeat customers.

It’s important to check in with the people you regularly work with to show interest and keep spirits high. It’s also important to market yourself to new customers. Either from your office or your cab think about where to go and who to call next instead of going in blind.

8. They answer to almost no one. While owner operators still have to comply with DOT regulations and taxes like the 2290 and IFTA they don’t have managers constantly watching them to make sure they follow every little company policy. They only keep up with their own standards which do involve a high level of professionalism. The fact is they have a nice level of freedom on the open road.

Are You Ready To Become An Owner Operator?


The average owner operator is a hard working person who is financially smart. They’re planners and don’t mind putting in a little extra elbow grease. If you’re ready to take the leap make sure you have a good head on your shoulders for being your own boss and the persistence and patience to make your business successful.

More more trucking tips keep coming back to ExpressTruckTax.com and be sure to share your facts about the average owner operator in the comment section below.
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