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Showing posts with label truck drivers. Show all posts
Showing posts with label truck drivers. Show all posts

Monday, November 14, 2016

5 Ways to Survive Truck Driving School

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Every year, tons of hopeful truckers enroll in schools and programs to get their CDL's. As with any training program, the work is tough, and you get out of it what you put in. But how can you make sure you survive the whole process? Let’s run through this!

Start Early


So once you’ve been accepted and enrolled into a program, you need to hit the ground running. Find out what books and training materials you need as soon as possible, and start reviewing.

Review everything. It’ll be tough, but you will understand more of what you’re learning later. Learn the definitions of words, or at least familiarize yourself with them.

Also, look into some online communities and learn what you can from there. Whether that’s lingo, or survival tips, you can find plenty in forums, social media, and blogs!

Study Hard


Oh, nobody wants to hear it. You need to study hard. Yeah, you’re going to spend a lot of time learning all this in your classes, but you’re gonna have to put in a ton of time and study hard.

Think about it, not everybody passes their CDL right away. You want to become a trucker, so you’re going to need to get through your training and learn as much as possible.

You don’t want to be a rookie trucker forever, do you? Or worse, a CDL dropout?

Start Sleeping Well


This is a tough one. You might not know this, but sleep is crucial for success, health, and happiness. While you might imagine a gruff, short-tempered trucker as the standard cut of the cloth, that isn’t actually the case.

But plenty of truckers out there have sleep problems from the lifestyle. Of course, this leads to risks. Without sleep, you can find yourself with a grumpy disposition, impaired immunity system, and unable to concentrate.

That’s why you need at least eight hours of sleep, which is even more important once you’re a truck driver. So start doing everything you can to improve your sleep schedule!

Start Being Healthy


When you’re learning the ins and outs of your CDL, you should also spend some of your time off implementing healthy habits that will stick with you in the cab.

Start with your fitness by creating a good workout routine that will stick with you. Learn how to use your environment and your own body, or find mobile fitness tools and routines you can take with you.

We’ve given you fitness advice before, but we’re also big proponents of healthy eating. Ask any trucker about food on the road, and you’ll find out that truck stops are full of convenience foods — not health food.

Now, we’re not saying you need to eat kale chips every day (they’re good, I swear!), but you should do what you can to eat plenty of fresh veggies, whole grains, and lean proteins. Your diet will affect your disposition as much as sleep and fitness, so start eating right!

Of course, there are other problem areas for truckers — like perpetual back injuries from sitting all day, for example. You will need to watch your health as a trucker, bottom line.

Plan Ahead


Our first bit of advice is to start setting personal goals beyond getting your CDL. All things considered, you will put in the hard work and it’ll pay off with a CDL, and hopefully a trucking job!

But then you will have to decide what kind of job you want to have, where you want to be based out of, and all sorts of other considerations.

While you’re still in school, figure out what you like about driving a truck, learn about company drivers as compared to owner operators, and connect with other students.

No matter what you do, getting your CDL is hard work. With all the hard work you put in, you’ll be a truck driver before you know it. Once you’re a trucker, we’ll be ready to help you e-file Form 2290 right here at ExpressTruckTax!


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Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Downtime Entertainment: Fun and Games on the Road

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Fun and Games on the Road
Fun and Games on the Road
When you’re out on the road, you have enough troubles to contend with.

Over the years, we’ve encouraged proper health through diet and exercise, but sometimes you need to give your mind a workout.

So we asked Susan, one of our truck tax experts and our resident Queen of Sage Advice, about how truckers can work their mental fortitude while on the road.

Here’s what she had to say:




You may spend most of your driving time in your own head. When you park at the end of your shift, all you want to do is decompress with some guilty pleasures, like binge watching TV shows or movies. But it’s much healthier to get out and about doing something physical (walking), social (talking with someone while you walk), or learning something new (juggling maybe?).

After some physical exercise, consider working that grey matter in your head with some games and puzzles.

Studies have shown working your body will increase oxygen flow throughout your system. They also show engaging in mental play can also be good for your overall health and well-being.

Putting the Pieces Together


With its birth around 1760, the jigsaw puzzle is a good way to work those brain muscles. Either done solitary or with a friend or two, puzzles have come quite a long way from its rudimentary beginning of paper on wood.

From small (100 pieces or less) to colossal (record breaking 24,000 pieces) there is a picture and number of pieces that will work for you. Puzzles can be kept with a puzzle keeper, found in many big box stores, or use a roll of felt to keep the pieces from moving around. You can even work puzzles online, use “free jigsaw puzzles” in your search.

Consider the Game at Hand


There are all kinds of card games available using standard decks or special decks, like Pinochle, UNO and many others. If you want to really flex your brain, consider learning Bridge, one of the greatest thinking card games around.

Cards can be played in groups or online. If you prefer, there is the ever popular Solitaire, but there are also variations of Solitaire, other than the well known Klondike.

There are books and online sources with instructions, or just look for virtual games where you can play a hand or two with players from around the world.

If You're Bored, Try Board Games


If you don’t have a physical board game available, take a look at what is available online. Scrabble has a broad online player universe, giving you the opportunity, just like with cards, to meet other game players from around the world.

There are always the classic games that will engage the brain just as well: dominoes, checkers, Chinese checkers (marbles), Bunco (dice), chess, and backgammon. Plus, there are many new incarnations of these games available.

Playing games, interacting with others in person (or online) can be just what ‘the doctor ordered’ to help you remain sharp and focused while on the road. The great thing about these mental gymnastics? You can play anytime and anywhere you park your rig.

When it comes to filing that 2290 HVUT, using an 8849 Schedule 6 for a refund, or filing that VIN correction, the team at ExpressTruckTax.com wants you to know that we don’t play around.

Our system makes it easy and fast to complete your filings. Plus, we are here to guide you through the steps so you can get on with your day.

Give us a call Monday - Friday, 8 am to 6 pm EST - or drop us an email with any questions you may have. Plus, drop in anytime and visit with us on Twitter or Facebook. It’s always nice to chat with friends!


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Friday, September 9, 2016

3 Reasons You're Not Cut out to Be a Trucker

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3 Reasons You're Not Cut out to Be a Trucker
3 Reasons You're Not Cut out to Be a Trucker
As we approach National Truck Driver Appreciation Week, we want to take a look at what makes truckers such a unique group.

First of all, they are the backbone of our country. Without a strong freight system, we’d have nothing! But that’s only one factor.

In order to be a trucker, you need to have strength, an adventurous spirit, and be able to handle long stretches of isolation.

Most importantly - not everybody is cut out to be a truck driver. Without the following characteristics, you wouldn't last long as a trucker.

You're Not Strong Enough


We don’t mean physically strong, although we are big proponents of trucker fitness.

Let’s face it, trucking is a hard gig. A lot of the difficulty has to do with the fact that you spend most of your day alone, in a confined space, while driving nonstop. Some truckers have a reputation for being rough around the edges, sarcastic, or just plain rude.

But that’s not true - well, not fully. Truckers have to deal with a lot. If you were a trucker, you would feel underappreciated over time, especially when you deal with dispatchers, shippers, receivers who don’t care about you. And if you keep odd hours, it’ll only compound these issues.

What we’re saying is, truckers handle a lot of stress - don’t take this lightly! If you think you have the right kind of mental and emotional strength to handle what they handle, proceed.

You're Not Adventurous Enough


When you’re a trucker, your job changes daily. Maybe not the overall job description, but the conditions, the locations, the people, and the mileage vary from gig to gig.

This can bother some people, especially if you want a nice, safe job - something never changing.

But you’d be missing out! When you’re a trucker, you’ll see more of the country than anybody else. You’re gonna see everything from the bays of New England to the mountains of Colorado.

Truckers have to put up with a lot, but the trade off is experiencing something very few others get to. They get to see every mile of this country on the open road.

You're Not Solitary Enough


Unless you’re co-driving, you’re gonna be all alone while you’re on the road.

Which means, you’re going to have to deal with a lot of stuff on your own. No friends to share a beer with, and no family to boost your spirits. Of course, with the availability of mobile phones, you can still stay connected - but it’s not always the same.

If you prefer riding alone, there are plenty of options to keep yourself entertained. You can listen to the chatter of the CB radio, find a favorite station on satellite radio, or download some fun and entertaining podcasts.

Let's face it, you wouldn't want to waste time at a cubicle with your boss peeking over your shoulder all the time. A lot of truck drivers are drawn to the freedom to be themselves wherever they want, whenever they want.

Truckers are a rare breed - and most American workers wouldn’t be able to handle the stress these drivers go through. So we want to thank every trucker out there for keeping our entire economy afloat!

On top of all this, truckers still have to handle a whole lot of tax forms, ranging from fuel taxes to heavy vehicle taxes.


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Wednesday, May 11, 2016

5 Reasons Truckers Get Burned Out

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Let’s face it, few things are worse than getting burned out on the job.

We hear about it all the time in the trucking industry, too. Maybe it’s the driver shortage, or maybe it’s the stress of the job.

But why do people get burned out? What challenges do truckers face that lead to burnout?

Not Enough Money


Nothing can demotivate a driver more than stagnating wages. It’s important to offer competitive rates in the industry, because people will need to be attracted into the profession. Or else labor will dry up over time.

Yet, money isn’t the biggest reason people leave the profession. In fact, money issues rarely account for more than 20% of exits from the industry.

Not Happy with Dispatching


When workers become dissatisfied with their supervisors, they will look for new opportunities elsewhere. We know that tension tends to exist between drivers and dispatchers/managers.

That’s why some companies have started initiatives to better profile and match drivers to dispatchers. This is a step in the right direction, but dispatching can still frustrate drivers.

Whether it’s unpaid wait time, being stranded far from home without a load, or bad directions—truckers have plenty to deal with between hauls.

Understandable how they might feel unappreciated.

No Appreciation


When a driver feels like they matter, they will put more effort and care into their work.

While truckers are used to hearing about their errors, receiving feedback on what they did right could help alleviate the frustrations that come with the job. Plus positive reinforcement from customers can help drivers set their own goals and improve relations.

Whether it's more customer feedback or initiatives taken to show drivers appreciation, something needs to give. Maybe even more me-time can help out!

No Home Time


Come on, who doesn’t want more time at home? Of course, the problem isn’t always just how much time at home.

But some drivers dislike the infrequency of time home, or the unpredictability of time off. Sometimes it's just how long each stay is.

Regardless, there should be efforts to maximize the recharging time drivers face when they get to go home. Whether that means routes closer to home or new scheduling efforts, there has to be a way.

Not What They Expected


But after everything is all said and done, a driver might realize this is not what they expected.

And if a driver is told they can earn a certain amount during recruitment, they may start to resent the company if the outcome is different. That results in recruiters looking shady and drivers feeling paranoid.

Maybe the problem isn’t money as much as it is the details of the job — the stress, the diet, or the schedule. Open communication will alleviate a lot of these issues.

One thing drivers won’t have to worry about is e-filing their IRS HVUT 2290 forms, because ExpressTruckTax has your back. Feel free to send us any questions you have at Support@ExpressTruckTax.com or by phone at 704.234.6005.

How do you think we can avoid driver burnout?


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Tuesday, February 23, 2016

What is the New Trucker Coercion Rule?

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You’ve been driving for hours, the sun long vanished behind the horizon, and you know you’re almost out of hours. That E-Log is ticking away, after all. But your dispatcher kept pushing forward, wanting you to get the freight there a bit faster. Between your lack of time and heavy eyelids, you know that feat is impossible.

You could stop now, or press on and keep driving. While you know you need to follow the rules, the dispatcher made it clear that you’re gonna start missing out on jobs if you don’t make this delivery in less hours than you have.

This is known as driver coercion.

Now thanks to the FMCSA’s trucker coercion rule, drivers can now report dispatchers, shippers, and other workers who encourage truckers to violate federal regulations to meet deadlines. With the new rule, financial penalties for shippers who coerce drivers into breaking the laws can reach up to $16,000. Basically, instead of risking your life, income, and future, the companies will now risk the coins that line their coffers.

In the words of the FMCSA:

“[The rule] addresses three key areas concerning driver coercion: procedures for commercial truck and bus drivers to report incidents of coercion to the FMCSA, steps the agency could take when responding to such allegations, and penalties that may be imposed on entities found to have coerced drivers.”

How did this rule start? Well, some commercial drivers reported pressure from shippers to violate federal safety regulations with threats of job termination, denial of future loads, reduced pay and hours, or even decreased future job opportunities.

How were drivers being coerced? The way most drivers faced it included ignoring driver hour limits, CDL requirements, drug and alcohol testing, and hazardous material transportation rules, among others.

“Any time a motor carrier, shipper, receiver, freight-forwarder, or broker demands that a schedule be met, one that the driver says would be impossible without violating hours-of-service restrictions or other safety regulations, that is coercion,” said FMCSA Acting Administrator Scott Darling. “No commercial driver should ever feel compelled to bypass important federal safety regulations and potentially endanger the lives of all travelers on the road.”

What should you do if you’re feeling coerced to break or bend a rule? First, you need to head to the National Consumer Complaint Database and file a report. While the FMCSA says the burden of proof is on the shippers, the truckers still have to provide evidence needed to sustain the fees against the violators. This means, make sure you have documentation of any incident you report, as the FMCSA will have to investigate these claims.

How does this affect you as a driver? Well, you know your limits and boundaries better than anyone else. Even if you disagree with these rules, your best call is to follow the new coercion rules, and to be upfront with the dispatchers and loaders.

Wait, still confused? Basically, the agency will now issue fines to companies who coerce drivers to break and bend laws to make deadlines.

While we can’t help you with pushy dispatchers, we can help you when it comes to filing your HVUT 2290s. If you have any questions, send us an email at support@expresstrucktax.com or give us a call at 704.234.6005.

What do you think about the new driver coercion rule?


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Monday, September 14, 2015

It’s National Truck Driver Appreciation Week

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That’s right! From Sept. 13 to 19, professional truck drivers across the country will be admired and acknowledged for their hard work and dedication in the industry. Businesses are offering promotions and hosting various events and tributes, such as free daily deals, coffee refills, and a health fair for free blood pressure screenings, glucose tests, and flu shots. In addition, our own affiliates are providing fun and memorable activities for National Truck Driver Appreciation Week. Take a look below or refer to TheTrucker.com to get the complete 411 on the following events:

Celadon Trucking


Steve Sommers from America’s Truckin’ Network will be at Celadon headquarters from Monday to Thursday while Kristi Lee and Tom Griswold from the Bob and Tom Show will be in attendance on Friday. Make sure to check out the schedule because something fun and special will be happening each day!

Con-way Truckload


Management will be providing delicious grilled lunches for their drivers at terminals, as well as giving away random items and prizes. Get yourself a free hat or T-shirt. You deserve it!

RWI Transportation


RWI has scheduled hourly giveaways from Monday to Friday, as well as daily food for its drivers. Don’t miss out—each operator can receive gifts and free truck washes!

Schneider


Drivers can come for free food and drinks as Schneider provides tents and grills at more than 100 of their locations. This week is also a chance for drivers to chat with executives and receive personal thanks for a job well done.


Did You Know?


To further commemorate approximately 3.5 million hard-working men and women who make up America’s trucking industry, I’d like to provide some interesting facts, courtesy of Planet Freight.

  • The trucking industry collects, on average, $650 billion in revenue each year. That is about 5% of America’s GDP. 
  • In the United States, there are over 200,000 female long haul drivers. 
  • There are about 15.5 million trucks operating in the United States today. 
  • The top transported goods in the United States are clothing, food, furniture, and electrical machinery equipment/goods. 
  • The trucking industry is expected to grow by about 21% over the next 10 years. 
  • Annually, trucking accounts for about 70% of all freight transported in the United States. 



A Note from Us


Everybody at ExpressTruckTax recognizes you and thanks you for not only for being a loyal customer but for impacting the trucking industry in such a powerful way. Without you, essential freight wouldn’t be moved across the U.S. every single day and our precious goods wouldn’t be delivered in a safe, timely manner. We appreciate you, Trucking Nation!

We’d love to speak with you if you have any questions or concerns. Just give us a call at 704.234.6005, email us at support@expresstrucktax.com, or drop us a line on Facebook or Twitter!



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Wednesday, September 2, 2015

#WellnessWednesday: Mindfulness for Truck Drivers

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Hello, truckers! I want to share an important fact before we get down to business. According to Corporate Wellness Magazine, “Nearly 1 of every 15 people in the workforce is employed in the trucking industry, including over 7 million truck drivers on our roads.” That’s a lot.

While it's unfortunate, stats have suggested that truck drivers are among the unhealthiest populations in America, mostly due to the particular lifestyle and lack of good nutritional options on the road. We must change this now! Who is with me?

Driving, although somewhat stressful at times, is a perfect opportunity for developing mindfulness, or a kind of meditation practice, if you will. Don’t worry, it’s not what you think, as Eden Kozlowski mentions in a Huffington Post article: “You don't need incense, an exotic location or to be transported to some elevated state of being. Your truck can be your sanctuary.”

With that said, let’s take a look at some ways to attain the state that enables you to reduce stress, maintain a healthy diet, and improve your quality of life:

Turn off the Radio and Enjoy the Silence


Yes, I’m referring to music, advertisements, and the news. Being in silence gives you the ability to fill your awareness with thoughts and perceptions, allowing your mind and body to relax more than ever. Engage in how your body feels—what is it that makes you feel good, tired, or happy?

Appreciate Your Surroundings


When you’re on the road, do you ever stop to fully experience your beautiful surroundings? Even though green landscapes may not appear everywhere you roam, it’s encouraged to appreciate the scenery when it’s there. Eden says, “Life can be incredibly repetitive, especially when on the road. So, if you are going to be ‘in it,’ participate and make it more.”

Shift Over to the Slow Lane


Sounds boring, right? Well, if you're trying to be more mindful, driving a tad below the speed limit can eliminate a lot of tension. Shift over to the slow lane and allow drivers to pass you if necessary. Hey, you can even wish them well!

Eat More Healthy Food


Part of being mindful is eating enjoyable and nutritious food while being aware of the nourishment you are consuming. Eden says that this practice “opens the door for you to see how important you are, how important food is, and how it provides nourishment not just for your body but also your soul.”

I do admit—it takes commitment and determination to attain mindfulness, but once you get the hang of it, I have no doubt that you will feel amazing effects. Eden says that with mindfulness, “You eventually start to trust life more, trust yourself more, you start to look at the bigger picture instead of all the clogging minutia.” That’s a big 10-4.

Do you have some tips on how to stay mindful on the road? Or maybe you would like to share some highlights from your own wellness journey. Either way, drop us a line on Facebook or Twitter! We love hearing from you, Trucking Nation!

And remember, if you haven’t done so already, it’s time to e-file your HVUT to avoid penalties!



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Wednesday, August 31, 2011

Be Ready to File Form 2290 for Heavy Highway Vehicles

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As the month of November moves closer and closer, you will want to be able to get your Form 2290 taken care of as swiftly as possible once it is made available. It is unfortunate enough that the filing process was delayed, but to avoid any future confusion about the issue, it would be beneficial to be ready to file once the form is available.

In order to make the filing process easier with the IRS using Form 2290, it is very important that you keep accurate records, just like you would when filing any other type of tax return. It is crucial for anyone filing form 2290 to maintain their records for at least 3 years prior to the filing date for any taxable highway vehicles registered to them. For fleet owners and small trucking companies who have filed form 2290 in the past, it is wise to always keep the 2290 records on hand, as one never knows when IRS inspection may take place. It is even important to save these returns if they are only for a part of a year. In the case of a suspended vehicle (public highway use was less than 5,000 miles/year) it is still necessary to keep records of Form 2290’s filed for them as well.

You will need to gather the following information before filing form 2290 to accelerate the filing process. You will need a description of all vehicles for which you are filing as well as a VIN (Vehicle Identification Number) for each one. You will also need to know the gross taxable weight of the vehicle.  It is also necessary to report the date the vehicle was acquired, as well as the name and address of the previous owner. The first use month for the taxable period is also required for reporting. If a vehicle is considered to be suspended, keep a record of actual highway mileage. If the vehicle is an agricultural vehicle, then keep accurate records of the number of miles it is driven on a farm or field. Keeping proper records of your 2290 information will be a great help to you in the unfortunate event of an audit.  It will also make the task of filing this form much easier.

ExpressTruckTax.com is an IRS authorized E-File provider who can help you file form 2290 as well as keep secure online records of previously filed form 2290’s. For more information on the 2290 filing process, heavy vehicle use tax, IRS payment methods, etc visit the Express Truck Tax website or call our Truck Tax experts at 704-234-6005. You can also email any questions to support@ExpressTruckTax.com.
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Saturday, August 20, 2011

Truck Tax Regulations for 2011 (HVUT)

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You don’t have to be a transportation expert to understand that Washington DC is known for its gridlock. The very worst of it is actually off the roads and on Capital Hill. While both parties in Congress continue to argue, there is a significant piece of legislation that has yet to be voted on. The delay of this legislation being enacted has thrown many people in the trucking & transportation industry for a loop.

The law previously referred to is a transportation law known as SAFETEA-LU – the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, and efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users – which expired in 2009, but it allowed the taxes associated with the Highway Trust Fund to be collected for an additional two years. When SAFETEA-LU became law in 2005, lawmakers added what they believed to be enough time to get the next multi-year transportation authorization bill in place.

Those two years have passed faster than expected and we are left without a new Highway Bill to replace it. The House and Senate committees are now drafting preliminary versions of the legislation and will continue to debate its details. Let’s hope that both sides come to an agreement soon to avoid massive confusion in the trucking industry. Trucking Regulations alone are complicated enough.

Under normal circumstances, tax provisions related to the Highway Trust Fund would be extended as part of the authorization. Unfortunately, no one can accurately predict what will happen in the future, especially with the extreme volatility between political parties of late. One thing that is predictable, however, is that ExpressTruckTax.com will keep updating their website and blog with the latest news affecting the Trucking Industry. Once there is more information available about the HVUT filing process, we will let you know. Express Truck Tax is the premier provider of Tax Services for the Trucking Industry; as soon as the IRS releases the new Form 2290, it will be available for EFiling at www.ExpressTruckTax.com.
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Friday, August 19, 2011

IRS Tax Implications for those in the Trucking Industry

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For many Owner-Operators of Heavy Highway Vehicles, the benefits of self employment make being on the open road a very exciting experience. However, due to the heavy regulation of the Trucking and Transportation Industry, there are various taxes you must pay for self-employment income earned as an independent truck driver. Since self-employed individuals are not subject to tax withholding, there is more control over periodic tax payments throughout the year, which can be cut down by claiming deductions for business expenses.

Self-Employment Tax

The Self-Employment tax applies to truck drivers who operate their own business. These taxes are imposed in order to fund the Social Security and Medicare programs. The disadvantage of paying these taxes as a self-employed individual is that you owe twice as much as taxpayers who earn their income from employment. This is because employers are responsible for paying the other half of these taxes for their employees. There is somewhat of a silver lining to this though, the IRS does allow you to claim a deduction for 50 percent of the self-employment tax payments you make as an adjustment to income.

Truck Driver Deductions

You are not required to pay income tax or self-employment tax on your gross earnings from self employed truck driving. Instead, it calculates your tax due on net earnings, which is equal to your gross earnings minus all deductions you can claim. In order to claim a deduction, the expense must be ordinary and necessary to operate your business. This may cover any number of expenses you incur, but typically, truck drivers may deduct the cost of gasoline, oil, truck repairs, insurance and parking charges. You may also deduct the cost of the truck itself by including the lease payments or depreciation of the purchase price in your deductions. And, if you ever stay in a hotel during those long road trips, you may deduct your lodging expenses also.
Other Truck Taxes

IRS Form 2290 is meant to send information about the usage of a commercial truck and to pay taxes on that use to the IRS. You can use this form for a single truck filing, or up to twenty-five vehicles can be reported on one form. The major reasons for filing the form include:
The typical Tax year for Form 2290 is from July 1st to June 30th of the next year. The form and any payment are typically due by the end of August of the corresponding year. The IRS requires that forms with 25 or more vehicles to be electronically filed.

As mentioned Earlier, the typical tax year is from July 1 to June 30, but this year it has changed. Due to legislation being held up in Congress, there has yet to be a legislation enacted to collect these Heavy Vehicle Use Taxes. The IRS has announced that it will not be accepting these 2290 forms until November 1 of this year.
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Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Why Former Drivers Make The Best Trucking Dispatchers

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Featured Blogger
Benjamin Bellville
If you are running a small trucking company and are large enough that you are needing to hire one or more trucking dispatchers then you really need to consider that a former driver can fill the position better than anyone else. Allow me to point out my reasoning here and by the time you have finished reading this I am sure you will agree with my reasoning.

Depending on the size of your company and how you approach your freight logistics you may have a need for trucking dispatchers who are able to also book freight with brokers and perform sales to obtain direct freight customers as well. While you may be able to find someone with sales experience they often will not have a firm understanding of what it realistically takes to transport the freight.

I’ve had dispatchers with no driving experience before and all they could do was look at things from an on paper best scenario viewpoint. These types will drive your drivers away quicker than anything because they tend to talk down to drivers and make them feel like dirt in general. It’s an attitude that will fester through your company and hurt you in the long run. While it would be difficult to teach these types what being out on the road is really like, it would be much easier to teach a former driver the freight logistics aspect of the trucking company.

A former driver can relate to the trials the current truck drivers face on a daily basis and they know what is possible to do legally, they will make your employees feel more at ease sort of like they have someone on their side in the grand scheme of things. Happier drivers will be more productive drivers as a result. Less stress will also lead to healthier truck drivers.

Using former drivers as trucking dispatchers can also save you money in the long run as they will know better how to handle emergency situations as more than likely they have probably experienced it themselves while out on the road. They will also have a basic knowledge of most other operations within the company and can be turned into the ultimate multitasking machine over time.

As you can see it just makes sense as a strong business decision that will provide a strong inner working to your trucking company for years to come. The same way that doing business a truck tax company like Express2290 will be a smart choice to benefit your bottom line.
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E-file your HVUT Form 2290 with ExpressTruckTax.